Archive | May 2017

“Mortal Recoil” Review

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Definitely one of the most chilling title cards in the series.

Original Airdate: May 2, 2011

Written & Storyboarded by: Jesse Moynihan & Cole Sanchez

This episode starts immediately where the last one left off, as we’re treated to a dramatically funny scene featuring Dr. Ice Cream and Nurse Poundcake. “Dramatically funny” is a key adjective in this episode; where Mortal Folly was a mostly intense, fast-paced episode, Mortal Recoil is much slower and blends comedy with horror elements.

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Immediately this one makes up for the mistakes of last episode by making the Ice King beneficial to the plot. His constant interruptions of Finn and Jake earlier bordered on the annoying side, but here his purpose is more to serve the main characters, but not before Finn can get rightfully pissed at him. It’s a bit of a breaking point for Finn to blow up at the IK this way. Finn has treated Ice King as a mild disturbance in the past, but never has he affected Finn or someone he cares about so dearly in such a devastating way. It’s a nice instance of Finn royally chewing him out, and letting off that steam allows for things to gradually improve as the episode continues.

The scenes that follow in PB’s bedroom are straight out of a horror movie, but they’re still played lightly enough to save from complete darkness. It’s sad to see that this is really the first time Finn is truly upfront with his feelings toward Bubblegum, but she’s completely possessed and her true self isn’t conscious at all. The only other time we get to see Finn engage in this emotional release again is in Burning Low, and he does so mostly out of anger and sorrow. Here, he’s doing it to express his genuine care and appreciation for the princess, which again, is sadly squandered by the circumstances of the situation.

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Even sadder is Jake’s little booty dance can’t rescue PB from the Lich’s overwhelming presence. Bubblegum is able to absorb massive amounts of power through the fluids Finn gave her, and becomes an entirely new force. This is, of course, when Finn tries to use the sweater to defeat the demonic presence of the Lich once again, but fails this time. Even though Finn confidently holds that his feelings for PB were what helped him defeat the Lich last time, he realizes that love isn’t always the answer to defeating evil, and there’s no guarantee that something that worked fine once will do its job the same way again. Which is where the Ice King comes in with a tale of his wizard eyes, as Finn finally accepts his help and we see the two team up for the very first time. It’s an appropriate fit to watch Ice King and Finn work together civilly for once, and shows just how much the Ice King has evolved from the first instance we saw him. The IK isn’t an evil villain in the slightest anymore. Rather, he’s someone who just wants the attention of the coolest guys in Ooo.

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It’s here that Princess Bubblegum literally dies, in an even more aggressive way than the last time. In the end, she’s rebuilt to be thirteen, something that we’re going to explore later on, even if it never really got off it’s feet. The episode ends in what almost feels like a cap to the series, but we’re left with one haunting wave from the Lich possessed snail, signaling for more to come. This episode is really just a terrific showcase of how much the Lich’s introduction has forever changed the history of the show. Sure, the status quo and the way things return back to the main formula a good chunk of the time still remain relatively untouched, but it’s with this episode that I realized that literally anything can happen in Adventure Time. Princess Bubblegum can become thirteen, some plot points may be held and resolved and a later point. It was just a crazy burst of intrigue that left me so excited for the rest of the series. I began to really appreciate that element of surprise that came with every AT episode. In the past, any surprises or twists that came with the plot could be easily brushed off as something that was contained to just the singular episode, but Mortal Recoil introduced us to the idea that anything can come back at any point, and the fate of the characters could be altered at any given moment. This is all conducted by the intro of the show’s greatest evil, and one that would continue to affect the existence of Ooo much more down the line.

Welp, that’s season two folks! It’s been a lot of fun covering these episodes the last couple months, and really only increases my interest and love of my all-time favorite show. Thanks to everyone who has been reading (special shoutout to fellow commentators Stuped1811 and LilPotato911!), this isn’t really a project I’m doing for copious amounts of viewers, but it always helps to know that people are reading! The full season two review and a bonus mini-review should be out later this week, but besides that, I’ll see y’all for season three!

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Favorite line: “Uh, bleach, lighter fluid, ammonia, gasoline, I dunno. Lady stuff.”

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“Mortal Folly” Review

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Original Airdate: May 2, 2011

Written & Storyboarded by: Rebecca Sugar & Adam Muto

This is a big one. This is the game-changer for most viewers, as it was for me at the young age of thirteen. The stakes are instantly raised in this episode with the introduction of the Lich as a major villain. We’ve previously seen him in His Hero, but this is the first time we truly get to experience the Lich as a villain. His presence in this episode adds new heightened danger that Finn and Jake aren’t typically used to dealing with, and this time they aren’t just facing a threat to save a single princess or candy person. As Jake acknowledges, they’re fighting for the sake of the entire world.

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Immediately we’re thrown into the action, with brief meditations seen by both Finn and Jake. Most notably, Finn imagines himself as a big, bulky hero (including a pretty sick bionic arm) showing that his view on true heroes is still a bit materialistic. As Finn has learned countless times throughout this particular season, a hero is not defined by shape, size, or glamour, and while he has begun to grasp this concept, he still is drawn to those attributes that legendary heroes such as Billy possess. As His Hero displayed, Finn was able to prove himself as a true hero by choosing his own path over the path of his mentor, and it’s appropriately fitting that Mortal Folly has him following in his mentor’s footsteps once again by facing off against the ultimate evil.

After we’re treated to a nice bit of lore and backstory regarding the Lich and Billy, the snail that appears in the background of every single episode frees our grotesquely designed villain from his prison. This really is terrific use of the snail as a plot device; it’s rewarding to those who have been paying attention long enough to notice the hidden snail, as well as a way of building up apprehension by having it possessed. Every time it appears after this, there’s a certain fear of what’s to come and a constant reminder that it’s still a part of the story. But before we get to that, the Lich’s place in this episode is eerie and unsettling, fitting with his appearance that’s especially grotesque and diverse from most other designs in the series. While working on this episode, Sugar and Muto tried to avoid any typical villain cliches as possible to make the Lich seem menacing and serious, and a big kudos to them for pulling it off so well.

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Of course, the episode isn’t entirely focused on tension and darkness. At the center lies a large heart with the relationship between PB and Finn. Although, it is kind of off when you think about it. I know Finn is considered a legendary hero in Ooo and he does ultimately end up defeating the Lich for the time being, but you’d think with all of the life experience Bubblegum possesses, she wouldn’t send a thirteen-year-old out to preserve the fate of the universe. But of course, these were different times, so I can ignore it. It doesn’t divert from the adorable amount of compassion for each other that the two share, and there’s no way you can convince me that PB doesn’t care about Finn in this situation. The sweater she gives him, whether it was meant to be protective from the Lich’s powers or not, was an ultimate token of her appreciation for Finn, and it’s really sweet that he has no hesitation wearing it at all.

On the other hand, if there’s one thing that constantly brings down this episode, it’s Ice King. Not to say he’s without his funny moments, but his interference with Finn and Jake really diverts from the main focus of the episode. I understand that they had to break the episode up a bit and it was completely necessary to include Ice King in it, but from a viewer’s perspective, it really takes you out of the moment when our two main heroes are on an epic quest to save the world and IK continuously gets in the way of it.

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Thankfully, the last third of the episode is primarily focused on the main issues at hand. I love, love, LOVE the abandoned subway setting. It makes for such a cool and well designed battle arena, and is just oozing with post-apocalyptic eye candy. Love the skeletons, love the colors, love how it’s not even explicitly mentioned as a subway. Things get serious when Billy’s gauntlet is crushed by the Lich without any hesitation at all, which is kinda fucked up when you think about it. That gauntlet was totally sentient! It blinked! The atmosphere immediately grows quiet and blood curdling when Finn’s pendant breaks and we get our first-ever bit of dialogue from the Lich, delivered menacingly, yet attractively by Ron Perlman.

“Aren’t you cold, Finn…? Walk into the well… Finn… Aren’t you cold…?”

It’s important to remember that, save for a few moments, we never really get to see the Lich do much of anything destructive throughout the series. Sure, it’s implied he had a big part in the outcome of the Great Mushroom War, but aside from that, everything that is threatening about the Lich comes entirely through his design and his voice. This makes him one of my favorite animated villains of all-time. We only get to see him every so often, but every time we do, we know this guy has potential to blow up entire worlds if he wants to. We know that he can’t be defeated anytime soon. We know that he could set off countless Mushroom Wars with the snap of a finger. Most importantly, we know that the Lich is the ultimate evil. Not through his actions, not through his adversaries, not through his treacherous backstory or anything like that, but simply because of his demeanor. He has no motivation for wanting to destroy all humanity besides the fact that he can and wants to. And there’s nothing scary than that.

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But of course, the one thing that protects Finn from potential destruction is the sweater PB made him. It’s sweet, because they didn’t pull some twist that the sweater has protective armor or guns shooting out of it or anything like that. It’s just a sweater. And that, coupled with Finn’s feelings of l-l-liking someone a lot, is what is able to save him in the end. Again, it’s easy to draw contrasts to Billy and Finn here. Billy was able to defeat the Lich with his gauntlet, whereas Finn failed to the first time he tried. It’s obvious that Billy’s power comes almost entirely from his brawn and strength, while Finn’s ultimate power comes from his heart. It’s a corny but important lesson that’s been enforced many times this season, and this feels like an ultimate driving point. It Finn’s sweater that defeats the Lich, as he lets out a final laugh that’s evidence enough that we won’t be seeing the last of him. It’s a triumphant moment of victory for Finn and Jake, but the moment doesn’t last for long, courtesy of the IK’s “dropsies.”

So there’s a good chunk of really good moments surrounding the main plot, and a good chunk of mediocre moments in regards to the Ice King’s bits. There’s still more than enough for this to be considered as a good episode. Terrific atmosphere, intense action, some brilliant character moments, and a very nice jaw-drop worthy ending in preparation for part two to boot.

Favorite line: “No, I’m not! I’VE GOT A SWEATER ON!”

“Heat Signature” Review

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Original Airdate: May 9, 2011

Written & Storyboarded by: Ako Castuera & Tom Herpich

Heat Signature is an oddball; it was supposed to be aired a week before the season two finale, but ended up being spontaneously dropped from the schedule that night and aired the week following Mortal Folly/Mortal Recoil. On the DVD order, it’s placed directly before those two episodes. That being said, I still don’t think it’s in the right order! In the episode prior, Finn and Jake gather everyone together to watch Heat Signature 3, so unless the two boys were blatantly intending to screen Heat Signature’s second sequel in front of Marceline before she had even seen the first one protected by government law, I think there’s some sort of mix-up with production codes here. That aside, this is actually another one of those AT episodes I’ve probably seen the least. I actually didn’t watch it the first time it aired, and kinda thought the preview for it was just some weird fever dream I had for a little while. Much like Henchman though, it’s an episode that continues to develop Marceline’s character and actually outlines some major behavioral changes for the remainder of the series.

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I just really love this brief little scene of Finn tossing Jake up and down.

I think the premise is actually quite interesting. Finn, as we know, is pretty reckless and willing to throw himself at any opposing force, but it’s pretty crazy how willing he is to be permanently turned into a vampire and sacrifice his stance as the last human. Even Jake, whose fear of vampires has plagued him, is totally willing to get bitten. It actually sort of makes sense if you look at the big picture of his character: Jake’s aging process has burdened him for a large chunk of the series, and with both of his parents passing after a relatively short lifespan, the promise of immortality, along with the fact that he’ll be able to look after Finn and stay with Lady for longer periods of time, just might seem promising to him. It could also just be that being a vampire in modern Ooo is considered super grunge and hipster, I dunno.

Wendy, Booboo, and Georgy aren’t really that interesting. They’re typical bullies with nothing that new or fun about them, but the faux trials they put Finn and Jake through are pretty amusing. I always forget that this is the episode with Lumpy Space Princess and a can of beans (for some reason I usually remember it being in To Cut a Woman’s Hair), and that always gets a big kick out of me. Speaking of kicks, I like the scene where the ghosts brutally kick the shit out of Finn and Jake too. It’s so cruel, but there’s something so painfully funny about the two of them still going along with it. Yeah, Finn and Jake are a bit oblivious to what’s going on in this episode, but for the most part, I think it works. I’m glad they didn’t go the route of having Finn and Jake be super pissed at Marceline for “not believing in them” or some nonsense, the show keeps out any unnecessary drama involving the two boys.

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The only necessary drama we need to see is between Marceline and her friends. This is really a true testament of Marceline’s character, and one that sticks with her throughout the rest of the series. For the past two seasons, Marceline’s been portrayed more as a prankster and an anti-hero, but her time spent with Finn and Jake has had an effective result on her improving moral code. If this had been any other person in the past, I do believe Marceline would’ve went through with whatever her ghost friends had in mind. But Marcy’s time spent with Finn and Jake has opened her character up to new levels of understanding and compassion, and it’s really delightful to watch her develop a little more with each episode she’s featured in. I do feel as though Marceline’s character has been toned down a bit more significantly as of Heat Signature, but of course, these were different times. This is primarily the climax of Marceline’s teasing of Finn and Jake, as her character arc shifts focus from the main duo to Ice King and Bubblegum majorly in the next couple of seasons. I think it’s an appropriate ending for this type of relationship she shares, as it’s obvious that’s she’s gained a newfound respect for Finn and Jake that she previously didn’t have before.

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So yeah, it’s definitely a goodie. Terrific character expansions, some nice backgrounds and colors, and a decent obstacle to put Finn and Jake through. According to Pen Ward, the actual Heat Signature movie is an animated film in-universe because, if it was considered live action, it would debunk his original theory that Finn’s dotted eyes and lack of nose signify that he’s a mutant. I never bought into that theory… Finn is the Human, dammit! Sorry, Mr. Ward. Can’t stand by you on that one.

Favorite line: “What if we turn evil? I’ll have to start wearing cologne.”

“Video Makers” Review

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Original Airdate: April 18, 2011

Written & Storyboarded by: Kent Osborne, Somvilay Xayaphone & David C. Smith

Pendleton Ward mentions in the commentary of this episode that he hates pitting Finn and Jake against each other. Simple reason: it’s just not fun. I completely concur with this notion, as with pretty much any series, watching two characters bicker for a majority episode just simply isn’t enjoyable or interesting enough to watch. Finn and Jake have a very close relationship, which means they’re prone to fight every now and then and get into disagreements. I personally think the episode Who Would Win? did a pretty decent job of that while still keeping the episode fun and enjoyable. How does this episode fare? Well, let’s check it out.

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It’s interesting to note that this is actually the first time the Great Mushroom War gets named dropped, and it’s done so in a relatively humorous way. I really like how seriously Finn and Jake take the Federal Warning, and it works perfectly as a conflict driver. I like how the literal apocalypse can be used for such a simple plot point like this one.

The scenes that follow are pretty humorous. I like that this is an episode that really uses most of the main and recurring AT characters to its advantage, and even giving some others a bit more screentime. For instance, this is really the first time Mr. Cupcake gets a chance to shine, and one of the first he’s pitted against Jake. Jake’s jealousy of him is pretty enjoyable, and I love how this is actually the start of a long term rivalry between the two of them. In addition, Shelby, one of my favorite side characters, gets some well deserved spotlight in this episode. Shelby’s general snarky attitude and diverse personality from the rest of the mostly optimistic AT characters is actually pretty refreshing, and the “check pleeeeease” line is definitely something I’ve considered putting on my graduation cap on more than one occasion. There’s also some other little fun gags at the beginning, like Finn’s magic cup that pours everyone’s preferred juice and oh-my-god-whatever-the-fuck PB was drinking. I seriously don’t know what to make of that.

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Aside from that, there’s simply not much to this one for me. Finn and Jake’s bitching at each other is tiresome, and it’s a bit ridiculously over-the-top for them to be angry at each other for such a dumb reason as picking a genre for their movie. I think it would’ve been way more interesting if they just went with the “two characters try to make a movie and it turns out terribly” plot, but instead they choose and obvious route that brings down the entire episode. It’s a shame really, because had they chose the former, they were headed in the right direction. There’s some other funny scenes like the one where Slime Princess jumps right into the crocodile pit and when Finn attempts to make it look like PB is riding the frog chariot, and if they just stuck with those ideas in mind, I think it would’ve turned out a much better product. Luckily BMO’s song (written by David C. Smith) is sweet enough to end the episode on a very endearing note, but otherwise, it’s a pretty weak entry from the second season.

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Favorite line: “Check pleeeeease!”

“The Limit” Review

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Original Airdate: April 11, 2011

Written & Storyboarded by: Cole Sanchez & Jesse Moynihan

Jake, despite being a magical shapeshifting dog that can transform into anything, is still very vulnerable when it comes to the topic of being injured and even the possibility of death. Jake’s aging process and cosmic destinies have been alluded to many, many times in the series, but The Limit poses a unique type of situation to put Jake through: a boundary to how far he is able to stretch. It not only brings that possibility to center stage, but it also showcases an extremely likable yet foolhardy side of Jake to put the needs of others before the needs of himself.

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First of all, the episode starts off great. It’s just Finn and Jake gracefully watching stars and talking about aspirations while hanging at Hot Dog Princess’s house. I really love whenever episodes begin with the two main characters hanging out with any random tertiary character. It really makes the world of Ooo seem so big and yet so small in terms of social circles at the same time. The rest of the episode takes place on an effectively cool maze crawl. There’s no trademark dungeon episode during the course of the second season, but I’d say this episode comes to closest to having that old school D&D feel: rescuing others, trekking through a confusing maze, varieties of different monsters, a devious wishmaster, and the Ancient Psychic Tandem War Elephant, of course!

The main plot of the episode makes the journey seem a bit paper thin. It’s mostly just Jake testing how far he’s able to stretch with, of course, dire results. Of course, the episode is filled with fun, flashy dialogue, silly songs, great side characters (the hot dog knights are a perfect example of well-written “too dumb to function” characters) and some fun beast battles. I do wish that they could’ve gone a little more detailed with some of the creatures Finn and Jake stand off with. There’s so many neat looking monsters and demons just chilling in certain parts of the maze, so the fact that Finn and Jake end up just dealing with one rock monster and a group of scorpions is fairly disappointing.

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The best part of the episode is surely the climax. Even though the creatures in the actual maze might not have been used to their advantage, Aquandrius is the kind of devious, slimy foe I’ve been wanting to see. He’s not necessarily unique in his motivations or intentions, but his design and name are just so inventive and mythological-feeling. In addition to that, the way Finn saves Jake feels a bit like a deus ex machina and relatively rushed, but I’m glad the show didn’t go the corny route of “Finn uses his last wish to save Jake, rather than what he wants.” It would’ve been sweet, but it’s a nice little subversion from what the viewing audience was expecting, and it certainly doesn’t make Finn seem unlikable either for thinking outside the box. Man, is Ancient Psychic Tandem War Elephant a great element to this episode too! Pen Ward mentioned that he worked a long time on the design of APTWE so people could eventually get tattoos of him on their body. It sure paid off too, Elly’s design feels like it’s straight out of ancient Buddhism. Also, I can’t believe that hot dog knight just brutally blew up on screen. At least he lives to see another day through the power of demonic magical wishes.

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Jesse Moynihan mentions in the commentary that there’s a nice little anti-moral with what’s going on with Jake’s character study in this episode, but I wouldn’t really call it an anti-moral so much as an actual moral. On so many different occasions, people are encouraged to try their hardest and, if they push themselves hard enough, they will succeed. The Limit focuses more on the idea that there is such a thing as pushing yourself too far, and it’s good to know when to step back, analyze a situation, and decide what’s best and most rational for yourself and the safety of others. Jake’s true heroism unravels in this episode, but unlike Finn, Jake is a bit more stubborn and prideful when it comes to showing off his strengths and hiding his weaknesses. Jake rarely ever expresses his true struggles throughout the series, meaning he has enough faith in himself and the idea that everything will be okay to ever quit what he instinctively believes is right. If he’s learned anything in this episode, however, is that he does have a limit, and as the series will explore later on, he’s not quite as immortal as it seems. Also, he’d much rather just have a sandwich than save himself from perishing. And if that doesn’t sound like Jake the Dog, I don’t know what does.

Favorite line: “Whoa! Fudge, man! This place is yoga balls huge!”

“Belly of the Beast” Review

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Original Airdate: April 4, 2011

Written & Storyboarded by: Kent Osborne & Somvilay Xayaphone

Belly of the Beast poses an interesting argument: is it better to remain ignorant or aware of your surroundings? With the many scary possibilities and dangers in the world around us, many would argue that it is better to ignore the world around you and just live your everyday life. AT delivers this with ambiguous results when Finn and Jake try and save a group of bears who love to party in a monster’s belly, but risk being converted into feces. The series leans more towards Finn and Jake’s understanding of the situation, but also does so without making the other side look like a bunch of idiots. Finn and Jake may be trying to help these people, but at the same time, the bears are just trying to live life and make a party out of it. And there ain’t no party like a beast’s belly party!

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One of the bears they do meet along the way is Party Pat, who is voiced by Andy Samberg and, as Pendleton Ward claims, “is basically Pat McHale.” Party Pat’s a delightfully odd central character for this episode; he seems like a really chill dude, but at the same time, I feel as though he could drug someone’s red solo cup at any given point. Samberg gives Pat that ominous and enigmatic feel, and he’s almost unrecognizable as this character. Why they wanted Samberg specifically for this role, I’m not sure. But hey, he does a great job, so why not? And speaking of voice roles, Jeremy Shada’s performance as Finn is hilarious in this episode. Shada has been getting more experimental and having more fun with his character as of lately, delivering some of his funniest bits of dialogue yet.

The animation in particular is really superb. I seriously have a tough time focusing on the main episode because of how many unique dance moves are being performed in the background. Ian-Jones Quartey provided a lot of the drawings of the bears in this episode, and specifically tried to make every bear’s dance routine different and have a specific cycle, which is really reflected in the final product.

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Like I mentioned above, the core of this episode is the debate of whether or not the bears should stay in the beast’s belly or not. The episode sort of takes some unusual turns in its execution, however. Although Finn and Jake help everyone to settle down through a humorously depressing song about dying food items (RIP milkshake, RIP donut) the bears ultimately decide to stay in the beast’s belly in the end. This poses a couple of plot holes: Wasn’t the original dilemma that the bears would be digested if they stayed in the monster’s stomach? Nothing has changed since they decided to return, so how does that resolve the central conflict? And if the beast is so concerned with having his mouth scorched by fireworks, then how is he unaffected by drinking lava?? They’re a couple of oddities that make this episode seem a bit uneven. It does help the general tone of the episode that the literal party animals would return once more to where the party all started. Although it may seem bleak for some to be living in a perilous situation, Party Pat and his crew know how to enjoy life and are able to deal with any given issue because of their lifestyle. It’s not for everyone, as Finn and Jake have displayed, but hey, when things get tough, why not party? It’s also an important trial for Finn, as he learns that he simply can’t help those who don’t want to be helped. It’s depressing to see his general disappointment in his failure to save the party crew, but he learns the hard way that he simply can’t force his beliefs onto others.

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It’s not necessarily the most structured episode plotwise, but Kent Osborne and Somvilay Xayaphone definitely has a good time with this one. It’s often reflected as one of their personal favorites of season two, and while I can’t say it’s one of my personal faves, it’s a relatively enjoyable one. It has it’s minor flaws like the ones I mentioned, and I’m not really crazy about the “night club” setting throughout the entirety (I thought they could’ve been much more creative with the contents of the beast’s body). It also has funny one-liners, silly side characters, the general annoyance of our main characters, some great songs, and a fast-paced fun environment to boot on the other hand. What more could anyone want in an early season Adventure Time episode?

Favorite line: “HELP ME! … hang these streamers!”

“Go With Me” Review

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Original Airdate: March 28, 2011

Written & Storyboarded by: Ako Castuera & Tom Herpich

Go With Me is Adventure Time at its purest: no big battles, no enticing adventures, no opposing villains, just engaging interactions between the characters and what makes them each so unique. Season two is certainly a lot more rounded in its humor and writing than the first season, but there are times during the second season that it can be a bit… “sitcom-y.” With some subversions, there’s a couple of different plots that feel as if they could be on any show (Blood Under the Skin, Heat Signature, Video Makers are some examples) and this episode could be included in that category. That doesn’t necessarily mean these are bad episodes, but part of the fun with AT is how unique and eccentric it can be with tackling your expectations vs. reality. However, Go With Me is a special episode that uses the characters to their very best abilities that avoids any feelings of being too generic or done-before.

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In my review of Henchman, I discussed how disappointing it is that Finn and Marceline barely interact outside of casual small talk in recent years. It’s really a shame, because if this episode is an example of anything, they are too freakin’ adorable together, and not even in a romantic sense. Obviously there is the giant age gap between the two, but I just generally enjoy watching Marceline tutor Finn on the experiences of life. Finn’s still very inexperienced with many topics, as he’s just recently entered his teen years. Marceline, however, has been around for ages. It’s really endearing to see the enjoyment Marceline has in shadowing a young companion, and the excitement Finn has in being taught how to talk to girls.

The way each character works off of each other in this episode is just splendid. Jake is still afraid of Marceline, Marceline still gets a kick out of fucking with Jake, Finn and Marceline I mentioned above, Finn and PB’s continuously awkward state, and a hint of Marceline and PB’s past history together is thrown in. I love how subtle it is as well; you really can’t gather anything from that brief bit of dialogue, but you know somethin’ is amiss. And hey, PB’s name is Bonnibel! Part of what adds to that mystery is that it’s really never revealed what Marceline’s motivation is behind helping Finn. She could legitimately want to help him score with Bonnie, but at the same time, she could also just be trying to spite the Princess. I mean, wrestling and being chased by wolves? Even Marceline, in her dark and mysterious ways, didn’t like being treated poorly by her ex-boyfriend Ash, so it’s very likely that it was all just a front to pick on PB.

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I love all of the awful advice Finn receives from Jake and Marceline and all the attempts he goes through to get PB’s attention, as well as just how far he’s willing to take it to do so. Jake and Marcy’s bickering and Finn’s general lack of experience with women is very sitcom-y, but hey, that doesn’t necessarily have to be a bad thing. I’d much rather watch these characters try to find a date for movie night than say, the cast of Full House, Saved by the Bell, or some other corny 90’s sitcom.

Like I said, it’s just really enjoyable to watch Finn and Marcy work off of each other. They’re two cool people who much rather enjoy having fun and enjoying life than feeling obligated to do what everyone else is doing. Finn learns an important life lesson in this episode: that he should follow what he wants to do rather than what society and social norms suggest. Finn probably would’ve been better off if he had just taken a blanket or duck to begin with, but hey, at least he got to spend the night with a good friend. Marceline taught him that valuable lesson, and she helped him to focus on excitement and livelihood in the end. It’s one relationship I never get tired of watching.

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Favorite line: “Naw, he just needs some spaghetti.”